Visual Studio Subscriptions

Many of us that work with SQL Server do so exclusively through SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS). I find so many people really do the majority of their jobs with SSMS, Outlook, and a web browser. Even back in 2003 when I was a full time DBA, I probably spent the majority of my time in those three applications.
However I also see more and more people using Visual Studio and other tools to accomplish their jobs. The growth of new tools, like Powershell, the expansion of our work into BI areas, and more mean that more and more people are using tools besides SSMS to work with SQL Server data.
This past week there was an announcement that MSDN subscriptions were changing. At most of my jobs, I’ve had an MSDN subscription available to me. In fact, some of you might remember the large binders of CDs (and later DVDs) that arrived on a regular basis and contained copies of all Microsoft software. However many of you out there haven’t had MSDN available to you, or you’ve struggled to justify the yearly $1000+ cost, but you do want to work on your careers and practice with Microsoft software.
At first I saw the yearly cost of MSDN at $799, which is a pretty large investment. However as I looked to the side, I saw a monthly subscription, no large commitment, available for $45. That’s not an extremely low cost for much of the world, but it’s very reasonable in the US. It’s also a great way to build a setup that allows you to work with a variety of Microsoft technologies at an affordable cost. What’s more, you can stop paying at any time. Or start again at any time.
I know that it can be a struggle to invest in your own career, probably more difficult to find time than money. However this is a good way to get access to the various development and server tools for a period of time if you want to tackle a project or force yourself to learn a new skill.
I’m glad that Microsoft has moved to a subscription model for MSDN. I expect to see this subscription growing as small companies use a small investment that scales linearly with new hires to provide their employees with tools. I can only hope that many other vendors adopt this same model and allow us to rent our tools, and upgrade, for a very reasonable cost. I just hope they all let us backup and save our settings in case we interrupt our subscription for a period of time.
Steve Jones

About way0utwest

Editor, SQLServerCentral
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One Response to Visual Studio Subscriptions

  1. Nic says:

    It’s worth noting that the $45 a month subscription gives you access to Visual Studio, and nothing else. If you want MSDN type benefits (like operating systems) then you are still stuck with the $539 cloud version (which also provides a $50/month Azure credit), or the more expensive $1199 standard subscription, which is the same as the $539 version, but also gives you a perpetual license on the products, so you can keep using them in test, even if you let the sub expire.
    Clear as mud.

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