Crack that Encrypted Data

Ransomware appears to be gaining some traction as a new trend. For awhile in my career, it was virus programs designed to send to all your contacts. Then it was infections to use your computer as part of a bot net. Now it’s encrypting your files and demanding a payment to get the password.

I’m starting to think that a)I need to ensure I have solid, better backups on all devices, and b) I should pay attention and be aware of decryption programs. I’d love to say that I could build a decryption program, like someone did, but as much as I’m interesting in encryption and study it, that’s a little out of my skillset wheelhouse.

I’m actually starting to think that this might be a way that people in communities, like the SQL Server community, can help each other. We can be aware of potential ransomware threats, like the one that hit this hospital, and potentially share ways to recover from the incident, or even decrypt the drives. In fact, I suspect it might be worth keeping a system handy to practice decryption techniques, if you can determine the attack vector.

I’m sure many organizations wouldn’t want to share details of attacks and infections, but this is exactly the type of information that we, as data professionals, should be sharing. It’s incredibly difficult to keep up with all the threats and attacks, not to mention the techniques to recover systems. I’d urge all of you to ask your employers if you can at least help others, even if you can’t disclose how or where you gained the knowledge. If nothing else, the information needs to be shared more publicly to allow us to better protect our systems and be effective custodians of data.

Steve Jones

The Voice of the DBA Podcast

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Editor, SQLServerCentral
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