Python Jupyter Notebooks in Azure

There’s a new feature in Azure, and I stumbled on it when someone posted a link on Twitter. Apologies, I can’t remember who, but I did click on the Azure Notebooks link and was intrigued. I’ve gotten Jupyter notebooks running on my local laptop, but these are often just on one machine. Having a place to share a notebook in the cloud is cool.

Once I clicked on the link, I found these are both R and Python notebooks, as well as F#. These allow you to essentially build a page of code and share it. It’s kind of like a REPL, kind of like a story. It’s a neat way of working through a problem. I clicked the Get Started link to get going and was prompted for a User ID.

2018-03-29 10_23_24-Custom Selection

Once I had my moniker setup, the next step was to edit my profile. That’s more important than a library, right?

2018-03-29 10_23_32-Custom Selection

Of course, I needed to fill out the profile with my avatar and some information.

2018-03-29 10_24_30-Microsoft Azure Notebooks

Next I need to create a library, which I’m guessing is a collection of notebooks. I clicked the link and had to enter a name. I decided on the classic HelloWorld name. I decided to keep this public, as I might want to share this with others.

2018-03-29 10_25_01-way0utwest - Microsoft Azure Notebooks

I’ve got a library, now let’s add something. I clicked the Readme.md, but it didn’t load. There was nothing there, as this is a blank file.

2018-03-29 10_25_34-HelloWorld_README.md (way0utwest) - Microsoft Azure Notebooks

I discovered I could right click the file in the list. This lets me edit it. Strange UX, but whatever. The file uses markdown as editing, which is fairly simple, but consists of a few characters to designate titles, lists, etc.

2018-03-29 10_27_08-HelloWorld (way0utwest) - Microsoft Azure Notebooks

I entered some text, and then my readme appeared below my notebook list, much like it goes on Github. My screenshot got taken after I’d experimented a bit, so you see a couple python notebooks as well.

2018-04-10 11_48_58-HelloWorld (way0utwest) - Microsoft Azure Notebooks

From there, I could add a notebook. I have choices. I started with Python, since that’s one of my learning goals.

2018-03-29 10_26_05-HelloWorld (way0utwest) - Microsoft Azure Notebooks

I give the notebook a name and create it.

2018-03-29 10_26_20-HelloWorld (way0utwest) - Microsoft Azure Notebooks

Once this is created, it appears as a Jupyter notebook. Essentially I have a repl-like command area, and once I enter code, I can click “Run” to execute it. You can see that my Hello, World program ran.

2018-03-29 10_26_45-Python Experiments

I can enter other code, and I’ve done a few things, just to practice some basics in Python. I’m working through some courses, and I’ll enter code in here to practice concepts.

2018-04-10 11_52_27-HelloWorld_Python Experiments.ipynb (way0utwest) - Microsoft Azure Notebooks

Jupyter notebooks are a good way of working through a problem and showing flow. They’re especially useful for sharing information with others and letting them follow your thought process.

About way0utwest

Editor, SQLServerCentral
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2 Responses to Python Jupyter Notebooks in Azure

  1. Pingback: Jupyter Notebooks In Azure – Curated SQL

  2. Pingback: Learning Goals–April Update | Voice of the DBA

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