The Log Chain

I ran across a question recently from someone that received a similar message to the one showed in this image:

2015-07-30 12_02_22-SQLQuery3.sql - ARISTOTLE.master (ARISTOTLE_Steve (62))_ - Microsoft SQL Server

In this case, the log chain is broken. I’ve received this message, usually from a script that is automatically restoring all the logs in a folder. I’ve also had clients call me with this message, saying their log shipping system is broken.

What has happened is that you (or someone) is restoring the logs out of order. Each log backup forms part of a sequence that we call the log chain. The restore process requires that each log backup be restored in the same sequence in which is was created.

In the error message above, SQL Server is letting you know that the Log Sequence Number (LSN) contained in the file from which a restore was attempted doesn’t match the last LSN in the restored database.

Fixing This

The fix is easy; restore the correct files in the correct order. In this case, I knew I’d taken 3 log backups, and I was restoring in the incorrect order. I’d restored log backup 1, and was now trying to restore log backup 3.

If I restored log backup 2 (using with norecovery), the restore would work. I could then restore log backup 3 and eventually bring the database online.

If you can’t find the correct log backup, then your database is still usable. Just run RESTORE DATABASE WITH RECOVERY, and you can access your data. However the data will only be correct to the point in time of the last successful restore.

That could be a serious problem if you are missing a log backup early in your restore sequence. It could be a career limiting problem.

Always be sure you keep all log backups since the earliest full backup you keep handy for restores and protect those files. Losing one could be a major problem for your organization.

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